ANDREA BRUCE

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Andrea Bruce is an award winning documentary photographer whose work focuses on people living in the aftermath of war. She concentrates on the social issues that are sometimes ignored and often ignited in war's wake.  Andrea started working in Iraq in 2003, bringing a local reporter’s knack for intimacy and community focus to the lives of Iraqis and the US military. For over ten years she has chronicled the world's most troubled areas, focusing on Iraq and Afghanistan. 

For eight years she worked as a staff photographer for The Washington Post and later as part of the VII Network (2010-2011). At The Post, she originated and authored a weekly column called "Unseen Iraq.” She also worked at The Concord Monitor and The St. Petersburg Times after graduating from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995. She is now a member/ owner of the photo agency NOOR. 

Check out more of Andrea's work here.


CATCHLIGHT FELLOWSHIP PROJECT

In partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Andrea Bruce’s project Our Democracy seeks to push people to look beyond politics and examine the social conditions that underpin our society, providing a visual record of the state of local democracy at this moment in U.S. history. Throughout the fellowship, Bruce will move and immerse herself in a different community each month, and use visual and audio storytelling to explore experiences and thoughts on contemporary democracy in the United States using Alexis de Tocqueville’s route studying democracy in the mid-1800s. The project also unfolds online, where it will be combined with an interactive map of the journey with multimedia content and data about the community’s social and political involvement.

Buchanan County, VA One factor in the idea of democracy is the changing state of the working class. Buchanan County, on the farthest west corner of Virginia, is home to the highest number of Trump supporters in the United States, mostly due to the President's promises to the coal industry. In recent months the coal industry has picked up. But many in the county, a county that relies heavily on federal help, are worried about the President's promises to cut benefits; including health care.